Why it matters

cropped-AMM_Logo_Wool.pngWhy it matters

  1. The manufacturing powerhouse  After WWII, the US was almost 50% of the global economy, bringing manufacturing to its peak. During America’s manufacturing peak we produced 80% of the world’s automobiles. Almost all of the products we used were manufactured in the US. We manufactured steel, textiles, furniture, planes, appliances and shoes, to name a few. Well, since 2001 more than 56,000 factories have left the US. Now, I am not suggesting every single product we use needs to be manufactured here in the US, but we need to be and remain the world’s manufacturing powerhouse.
  2. Manufacturing employs people — At its height, US manufacturing employed more than 19 million people. Over the last couple of decades, along with losing our factories, we have lost our jobs. According to the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) and the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), manufacturing in the US currently employs just over 12 million people. Although losing more than 7 million jobs is alarming, what is more alarming is that, unlike the service sector, for every manufacturing job there are approximately 1.6 jobs created.  For example, in the recently released film, The American Made Movie, we see the Louisville Slugger, an American made product supporting a great American tradition. In order to create one baseball bat there are: loggers to cut trees, truck drivers to deliver them to the mill, mill workers to create billets, truck drivers to deliver them to the factory to manufacture the bats, marketers to market them and retailers to sell them. Manufacturing employs people.
  3. Manufacturing keeps the US competitive — According to the NAM review of National Science Foundation reports, manufacturers in the US perform two-thirds of all private sector R&D in the nation, driving more innovation than any other sector. Our engineers, techs, and science professionals keep us abreast of technologies, advancements, and developments.